recent work

White Oak Pastures Website Revamp

I first met Will Harris and his daughters Jenni and Jodi eleven years ago, on my inaugural photo shoot for Whole Foods Market. They have become like family.

I’m proud to have collaborated with the Harris’s this year on a website redesign for White Oak Pastures, which launches today. Woo hoo! In addition to leading the above video effort, I had the opportunity to contribute on copywriting and food photography fronts.

Check out the full website here: https://www.whiteoakpastures.com

The Jiggling, Gelatinous Creations of a Pop-Up Jell-O Exhibition || Atlas Obscura

  “Nothing Says I Love You Like Green Jell-O” by chef Justin K. Dillree.    PHOTO COURTESY KATE MEDLEY

“Nothing Says I Love You Like Green Jell-O” by chef Justin K. Dillree.  PHOTO COURTESY KATE MEDLEY

“It started as a joke,” says Emily Wallace, “and then we were like, ‘Actually, that’s not a bad idea.’”

The idea was a pop-up event celebrating the art of sculpted foods, particularly gelatin foods in all their elaborate, multi-colored glory. (Whether they be savory aspics or fruit-filled Jell-Os.) The name, chosen by Emily with her friends Kate Elia and Kate Medley, was “O Moldy Night,” a riff on the iconic Christmas carol “O Holy Night” referring to the many molds used to shape Jell-O and aspics. So one night in Durham, North Carolina, home cooks and professional chefs displayed their creative concoctions in a hotel lobby. Beyond Jell-O, most anything made with a mold was welcome.

The three main organizers, Medley, Wallace, and Elia, work as artists and professionals in the local culinary scene and have an interest in blurring the line between art and food.

“Molded foods are so visually stunning and weird,” says Medley, a photographer and filmmaker. “Why not elevate them on a pedestal?”

Read more here: https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/jello-art

O Moldy Night || The Bitter Southerner

O Moldy Night is featured in this week's Bitter Southerner!

Organized and curated by Kate Medley, Emily Wallace, and Kate Elia, 'O Moldy Night' was a pop-up museum at The Durham Hotel, celebrating all types of sculpted foods, with contributions from professional chefs, confectioners, home cooks, grandmothers, performance artists, and more. Forty works of art were exhibited, and then devoured.

Read more here: http://bittersoutherner.com/o-moldy-night-southern-molded-food-jello/

Molded foods no longer are in the past || Raleigh News & Observer

Crab and tomato aspic.

March 02, 2018 05:50 PM

Behold the Jell-O shot, the last surviving member of one of the weirder culinary traditions: sculpted food.

Something about the foods that wiggle and jiggle took them out of food fashion decades ago. 

But molds, aspics and Jell-Os – all actively forgotten in the annals of culinary history – will have their retrospective, their moment in the, well, not sun exactly because they might melt, but a kind of spotlight for sure. 

This Sunday, the Durham Hotel is hosting an edible art show called “O Moldy Night,”reviving and celebrating the wonders and curiosities of sculpted foods, prepared by some of the area’s best chefs.


Read more here: https://www.newsobserver.com/living/food-drink/article203197894.html#storylink=cpy

 

Death of Edgar Ray Killen

 Edgar Ray Killen at his Neshoba County, Mississippi home in 2005.

Edgar Ray Killen at his Neshoba County, Mississippi home in 2005.

In 2005, I spent the two weeks leading up to Edgar Ray Killen’s trial in his Neshoba County home doing an oral history and portraits with him. It was my first real lesson in the complexity of class, race, and most of all, the South. Today Killen died.

Inclusion in BBC's Most Striking Images of 2017

  Days after clashes in Charlottesville, Va., protesters toppled a statue of a Confederate soldier that had stood in front of the old Durham County Courthouse in North Carolina for nearly a century.   Image by Kate Medley/Reuters

Days after clashes in Charlottesville, Va., protesters toppled a statue of a Confederate soldier that had stood in front of the old Durham County Courthouse in North Carolina for nearly a century. Image by Kate Medley/Reuters

Proud to have this image included in the BBC's Most Striking Images of 2017. (Proof that the best camera - in this case, the iPhone 6 - is the one you have with you.)

See the full list here: http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20171220-the-most-striking-images-of-2017

Protesters in Durham Topple a Confederate Monument || The New York Times

Days after clashes in Charlottesville, Va., protesters toppled a statue of a Confederate soldier that had stood in front of the old Durham County Courthouse in North Carolina for nearly a century. Image by Kate Medley/Reuters

I happened to be in downtown Durham when I heard news that protestors were trying to bring down the Confederate statue on Main Street. They were marching off by the time I arrived. But I was happy to sell some images to Reuters, which quickly got picked up by The New York Times, among other national and international publications.